The Rogue Tomato

Interested in all things spunky, intelligent, inspirational, and unconventional.
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WHAT TO DO WHEN SOMEONE HAS A SEIZURE:

 I think this is helpful info for public dissemination. NOTE: DO NOT PUT ANYTHING IN THE PERSON’S MOUTH! It is folklore that people can “swallow their tongue” during a seizure. Putting something in their mouth presents the possibility that they swallow a piece of whatever you stuck in there or that the object itself causes injury to the airway. As mentioned in the graphic, to “protect” the person’s airway, you can turn them on their side when it seems practical/safe to do so.

(Source: hannahpoptarts)

The perfect 7 minutes workout. via @nytimes here.

“In day-to-day life we want everything to be faster, and then somehow our souls are crying out for something else,” says Alderman.
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<3 Solange 

This is like a candy that’s sweet in a subtle way so you can suck on it for a while and don’t have to go all nuts digging into it. And afterwards your mouth doesn’t hurt and you don’t feel guilty.

@surfing4change is a well-conceived and well-executed project in Nicaragua that seeks to moderate the local effects of surf tourism. This is an interesting movie about an inspiring project. Check it out and share!

stylelikeu:

Arabelle Sicardi is inspired by the work of Jenny Holzer

stylelikeu:

Arabelle Sicardi is inspired by the work of Jenny Holzer

"Too many young folk have addiction to superficial things and not enough conviction for substantial things like justice, truth and love." - Cornell West (who else?)

"Too many young folk have addiction to superficial things and not enough conviction for substantial things like justice, truth and love." - Cornell West (who else?)

(Source: thosedamnliberals)

Find your perfect yoga style for *right now*. This is funny, cute, and rather apt.

Leaky Gut Syndrome and Why Low Inflammation Diets are The Next Big Thing 

This is an even-handed personal narrative published in the @NYTimes today about a woman whose son’s juvenile arthritis was alleviated with dietary changes known to reduce to inflammation, namely cutting out gluten. The author also acknowledges the important role that strong drugs have in treating juvenile arthritis but makes a reasonable call to consider the adjuvant help of dietary changes. I recommend it. 

It also brings to mind how difficult it can be as a doctor when you hear your patients express interest in pursuing treatments that you may think have no scientific basis. In this case, the author’s interest in diet changes had some scientific basis and now has increasing evidence behind it. But, there can be other times when our patients don’t believe what we’re telling them. And that presents a big challenge to our mind and our ego. Might they be right? Or, might we have to push harder? It’s a tough call, and I guess we push as much as we think is right and reasonable. But, throughout it all, we must remember how little we understand. We, as doctors, must always remember that our understanding is miniscule and shape-shifting.

A human being is a part of the whole, called by us the “Universe,”
a part limited in time and space. He experiences himself, his thoughts and feelings as something separate from the rest— a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest to us.

Our task must be to free ourselves from this prison by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty.

Albert Einstein

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